What do bus stops tell us? A long-term perspective on a family of objects (not only) designed and used for waiting - Université Paris Cité Access content directly
Conference Papers Year : 2015

What do bus stops tell us? A long-term perspective on a family of objects (not only) designed and used for waiting

Abstract

The bus system is probably the oldest public transport system in the European cities. Directly linked to the processes of industrialization and urbanization, it has been operated during the 19 th century with horse-‐drawn vehicles, before getting motorized during the first decades of the 20 th century. By the way, the bus system has slightly become the slowest one, in comparison with the underground and the tramway, but also with the car. As a consequence, buses have built a peculiar relationship to speed, and more generally to time. This paper proposes to shed light on this relationship by addressing the problem of waiting for buses and the historical evolution of technical devices designed for this activity. Different generations of bus stops can be identified : small connexion stations with employees, bus poles, bus shelters of different scales, etc. These objects raise different questions. Who are the actors behind them and how are they conceived, designed and financed? What are the uses developed by people around them? How do they integrate the landscape of the city and become a constitutive element of the local identity?
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
Passalacqua_Arnaud_Bus_shelters.pdf (64.31 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin Files produced by the author(s)

Dates and versions

hal-01374135 , version 1 (29-09-2016)

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-01374135 , version 1

Cite

Arnaud Passalacqua. What do bus stops tell us? A long-term perspective on a family of objects (not only) designed and used for waiting. The Future of Mobilities: Flows, Transport and Communications, Traffic, Transport and Mobility, Sep 2015, Caserta, Italy. ⟨hal-01374135⟩

Collections

UNIV-PARIS7
111 View
60 Download

Share

Gmail Mastodon Facebook X LinkedIn More